Diario del proyecto Activating for Citizen Science

15 de septiembre de 2021

August 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 7,011 ( 6866 in Australia)
Species 1917
Identifiers 453
Observers 53 ( 27 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @streglystendec @twan3253 @stephen169 @ethan241 @hatwise @nyoni-pete @karenweaving62 @aavankampen @chrisseager @leithallb @zachmalcomson @rsmalley @sarinozi @rwl @rodolfosalinas @anthonypaul @nswanson @owen65 @mj_taylor @martin487 @pam275 @melbo @thbata1 @mary-a-crawf @rich_fuller

For the latest stats check out the August Challenge-Updated Stats

The 51 Australian observers contributing this month was a decrease on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 9.5 % of all observations within Australia (72,482) over the month of August (at time of writing). While the 51 observers constituted only around 1.2% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
The most observed species observed in the month was The Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula (below © Greg Tasney )

For the latest results of the current Month check the
August Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
August Challenge-Updated Stats
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere
Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

Please remember selecting the appropriate copyright is important, we recommend that you select a default that allows observations to be loaded to GBIF

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1 @nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller @rwl @fairypossum @nikonoid @anthonypaul @leithallb @luis615 @pam275 @ethan_yeoman @sandy_horne @grisper1 @timothyshields @jacksonnugent @chrisseager @mary-a-crawf @seamus-doherty @the_spangled_drongo @bigpete @heathwallum @jeannie_bartram @elfir @ichigo_ @natrydd @craig_williams @dragonette @marionmackenzie @sammybee @savurs

Ingresado el 15 de septiembre de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

08 de agosto de 2021

July 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 5,333 ( 5059 in Australia)
Species 1722
Identifiers 427
Observers 46 ( 19 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1
@nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller

For the latest stats check out the July Challenge-Updated Stats

The 43 Australian observers contributing this month was a decrease on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 8.8 % of all observations within Australia (56, 937) over the month of June (at time of writing). While the 43 observers constituted only around 1.3% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.
The most observed species observed in the month was the Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen (below © Zach Malcomson, all rights reserved)

For the latest results of the current Month check the
August Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
July Challenge-Updated Stats
June Challenge-Updated Stats
May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021

The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring.

The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning using the citizen science platform iNaturalist. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year! The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere
Check out the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 umbrella project .

This month we have som amazing observations from Richard Fuller (@rich_fuller), originally from the UK, he moved to Australia in 2008. Travelled quite a bit, but becoming more and more interested in local natural history, particularly in Brisbane where he is based. It looks like he has had the oppertunity to head up to the north of Queensland over the month and taken some amazing observations check out his observations for July here

Euploea eichhorni(left), Gram Blue Euchrysops cnejus (right) observed by Richard Fuller, (@rich_fuller),

With the cooler weather in the south, it's a Fungi bonanza and Michael Burrell (@streglystendec) is definitely one to take inspiration from in South Australia, have a look at Mikes July observations here


Ramaria lorithamnus (top left), Pixie's Parasol Mycena interrupta (top right)
Peeling Oysterling Crepidotus mollis (bottom left) and Sulphur Tuft Hypholoma fasciculare (bottom right)
Mike also recorded two occurrences of Neobarya agaricicola which are the first observations of this species in South Australia (below). It is commonly observed in Victoria and New Zealand with a few observations in Tasmania. It is a small fungus that is found colonizing other fungi. One to look out for in the future to see if it is more widespread in S.A. this was mentioned in the comments below., thanks @streglystendec

Last month Michael also found the shell of Emmalena gawleri (Brazier, 1872) in Belair National Park (below). They are a native carnivorous land snail that are not often observed due to their cryptic habitat. Only 4 observations are recorded in iNaturalist – 1 live specimen and 3 dead shells. Distribution: Mt Lofty Ranges and coastal environs to the South Flinders Ranges, South East South Australia (Australian Land Snails Volume 2).

Please remember selecting the appropriate copyright is important, we recommend that you select a default that allows observations to be loaded to GBIF

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@gregtasney @ethan241 @natashataylor @zachmalcomson @hatwise @stephen169 @nyoni-pete @rodolfosalinas @ludwig_muller @aavankampen @karenweaving62 @mj_taylor @thbata1 @nswanson @donnamareetomkinson @naturemum101 @owen65 @streglystendec @rich_fuller @rwl @fairypossum @nikonoid @anthonypaul @leithallb @luis615 @pam275 @ethan_yeoman @sandy_horne @grisper1 @timothyshields @jacksonnugent @chrisseager @mary-a-crawf @seamus-doherty @the_spangled_drongo @bigpete @heathwallum @jeannie_bartram @elfir @ichigo_ @natrydd @craig_williams @dragonette @marionmackenzie @sammybee @savurs

Ingresado el 08 de agosto de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 6 comentarios | Deja un comentario

11 de julio de 2021

100,000 observations from 60 users

Hey everyone what a fantastic achievement, the group has passed 100, 000 observations!

This has included observations from around Australia and beyond, I am truly amazed at the diversity we have discovered. Please let me know what is your favourite observation or species in the comments below.
The most commonly observed organism with 807 observations is the Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen in fact the top 5 are all birds! Have a look at all the 10,174 species we have catalogued here.


Magpie observed by
@twan3253 Mount Tomah NSW 2758, Australia
Unsurprisingly The European Honey Bee Apis mellifera with 447 observations has been the most commonly observed insect. However, the much more interesting Common Evening Brown Melanitis leda is not far behind with 304 observations






Ingresado el 11 de julio de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

09 de julio de 2021

June 2021 Challenge - summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 5651 ( 5339 in Australia)
Species 1597
Identifiers 391
Observers 56 ( 18 with more than 50 observations at the time of writing)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @ethan241 @grisper1 @stephen169 @donnamareetomkinson @twan3253 @ ludwig_muller @zachmalcomson @hatwise @hatwise @thbata1 @karenweaving62 @nyoni-pete @leithallb @rodolfosalinas @rwl@anthonypaul

For the latest stats check out the July Challenge-Updated Stats

The 53 Australian observers contributing this month was a slight increase on the previous month. Together our observations accounted for around 9.7 % of all observations within Australia (54, 668) over the month of June (at time of writing). While the 53 observers constituted only around 1.6% of all iNaturalists observers active during the month Australia.

For the latest results of the current Month check the
June Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to

May Challenge-Updated Stats
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary


Wedge-tailed Eagle Aquila audax and a Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita observed by © anthonypaul,

How good is Greg?

How good is it when you find a plant, particularly a fern that you cannot for the life of you identify and the person who the species is named after identifies the observation?

Rasp Fern Blechnum parrisiae observed by @gregtasney, Lockyer, Gatton, Queensland

Blechnum parrisiae - Rasp Fern. "Etymology: Named in honour of Barbara Sydney Parris (1945–), New Zealand pteridologist with a special interest in Doodia and gammitid ferns".
@barbaraparris Found at Helidon Hills.
Interestingly @donnamareetomkinson came across dozens of Orange Bushbrown Mycalesis terminus beside a creek on Portland Rd, Lockhart that they stopped at.

Orange Bushbrown Mycalesis terminus observed by @donnamareetomkinson, Lockhart QLD

left Painted Grasshawk Neurothemis stigmatizans and Grass Skippers Subfamily Hesperiinae observed by ©donnamareetomkinson in Cook, QLD, Australia

jumping spider probably Genus Cosmophasis observed by ©donnamareetomkinson in Cook, QLD, Australia

with the City Nature Challenge held over the first weekend of May this month it will be amazing to see what we find!

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@sarinozi @chrisseager @streglystendec @owen65 @aavankampen @melbo @dragonette @jeannie_bartram @carl_ramirez @nswanson @verna29 @ellurasanctuary @larissabrazsousa @sandy_horne @heathwallum @seamus-doherty @mickey63 @rubbery @natrydd @fairypossum
@gagars @bbrice @diondior @elfir @marionmackenzie @strawberry15

Ingresado el 09 de julio de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

17 de junio de 2021

New Annotation: Evidence of Presence

in case you missed it a new type of annotation called Evidence of Presence has just been introduced to iNaturalist, and originated from suggestions by members of the iNaturalist community. Check out the forum post about it!

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/new-annotation-evidence-of-presence/23945

The criteria we used to decide which types of evidence to include for the rollout:

Will most people understand what the term means?
Is it commonly observed and relevant to a broad group of taxa?
Will it noticeably improve parts of iNaturalist such as the taxon photo browser, searches, or collection projects?

Evidence of Presence annotations will only appear for observations within Kingdom Animalia 1 (except for humans), and there are six possible values at launch, defined as follows:

Organism: Whole or partial organism.
Scat: Fecal matter (not owl pellets or other regurgitated matter).
Track: Impression in ground or snow made by an organism.
Feather (within Aves only): One or more feathers not attached to an organism.
Molt (within Arthropoda and Reptilia only): Discarded skin or exoskeleton.
Bone (within Vertebrata only): Predominantly endoskeletal remains. Partial bone exposure in an otherwise intact organism should be labeled “organism”.

Ingresado el 17 de junio de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

06 de junio de 2021

May 2021 Challenge summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 8,053 (7,611 in Australia)
Species 2330
Identifiers 515
Observers 50 (22 with more than 50 observations, and I note the double Greg by @gregtasney is that even a thing?)

@gregtasney @stephen169 @natashataylor @ethan241 @ludwig_muller @zachmalcomson @grisper1 @hatwise @streglystendec @mary-a-crawf @dragonette @sarinozi @aavankampen @ethan_yeoman @anthonypaul @rich_fuller @pam275 @bigpete @luis615 @adel_plainsgirl @bigpete @leithallb @seamus-doherty @melbo

For the latest stats check out the June Challenge-Updated Stats

This while only 50 observers contributed this month an increase on the previous month, together our observations accounted for around 10 % of all observations within Australia (74, 433) over the month of April (at time of writing). While the 50 observers constituted only 1.3% of all active observers iNaturalists within Australia. With the City Nature Challenge being held earlier in the month a higher number of observations would have been expected. However, this year there was no coordinated promotion of the event due to third parties being involved. While disappointing, I hope this issue can be resolved.

For the latest results of the current Month check the
June Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
Maysummary
April summary
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Great Southern Bioblitz

Check out the engagement project the Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2021
The 'Great Southern BioBlitz', or 'GSB' for short, is an international period of intense biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within several designated areas across the Southern Hemisphere in Spring, this will be the second year we have run the event.

​The purpose of this event is to highlight both the immense biodiversity spread across the Southern Hemisphere in the flourishing springtime, as well as to engage the public in science and nature learning. As we are international, in Spanish we are known as 'Gran Biobúsqueda del Sur', while in Portuguese we are known as 'Grande BioBlitz do Hemisfério Sul'. By the end of October, the natural world is on full throttle. Flowers are blooming, insects are emerging, birds are singing, and reptiles are coming out of their winter hibernation. It makes sense for the Southern Hemisphere to observe life at this time of year!

The #GSB21 will be held from Friday the 22nd of October until the end of Monday on the 25th of October, incorporating different communities, areas and regions across the Southern Hemisphere.

Use #GSB2021 #GreatSouthernBioblitz on social media
Great Southern Bioblitz website

Updated Banner pic

I have chosen this wonderful pair of Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae © anthonypaul

@ellurasanctuary was excited by this find back in early May a big one at around ~19mm, an Adelaide Unicorn Beetle Novapus adelaidae. Who says Unicorns don't exist? this is one of three observed on their property in rural South Australia.

A female Adelaide Unicorn Beetle Novapus adelaidae © Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach Conservation Park,
This was recently paired with a male, Marie's second find, this time alive though :-)
Considerably smaller than the previous one at ~17mm (the previous specimen was ~21mm)

A male Adelaide Unicorn Beetle Novapus adelaidae © Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach Conservation Park,

I was at Cox Scrub Conservation Park, South Australia in late May and found this wonderous Hare Orchid Leporella fimbriata © Stephen Fricker, certainly a highlight of the walk


This was not the only interesting find! with plenty of floral resources about there were several butterflies and moths about the park, despite the cool weather such as the Australian Painted Lady Vanessa kershawi (left) and this Common Grass-Blue Zizina otis ssp. labradus (right) #ownpic


I also observed some quite large wasp species Foraging in the low scrub.

I have been and will be quite busy so please send me your best observations and I will include them in my next post.

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@sarinozi @chrisseager @streglystendec @owen65 @aavankampen @melbo @dragonette @jeannie_bartram @carl_ramirez @nswanson @verna29 @ellurasanctuary @larissabrazsousa @sandy_horne @heathwallum @seamus-doherty @mickey63 @rubbery @natrydd @fairypossum
@gagars @bbrice @diondior @elfir @marionmackenzie @strawberry15


Ingresado el 06 de junio de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

29 de mayo de 2021

Looking forward to June 2021

The weather is cooling, particularly down in southern Australia. This does not mean our outdoor adventure should stop. Hopefully, with a bit of rain, the mushrooms will become more prevalent in the southern hemisphere (@thbata1 ). Did you know the most observed mushroom in our network during June is the introduced Fly Agaric Amanita muscaria?


The introduced Fly Agaric Amanita muscaria observed by
@owen65 (left) @streglystendec (right)
I wonder how many species we will find this month?
Let me know what is your favourite species in the comments below!

Feature project Queensland

Tamborine National Park
there seems to be a lack of projects centred on national parks, if you know of any please let me know below. This month I will feature on of my Favourites Tamborine National Park check it out !
the area only has one project that I am aware of so check that out as well. If you make it to the park during June please share some of your observations below.
Project prepared and managed by Tamborine Mountain Natural History Association (TMNHA). We are a not-for-profit group. TMNHA looks to discover, collect and communicate knowledge about the natural history of Tamborine Mountain.
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/tmnha-tamborine-mountain-species-data

Park of the Month (In SA)

June – Mount Remarkable National Park
In South Australia, the National Parks and Wildlife Service, South Australia features a Park of the Month is a great way to gain a deeper understanding of our special natural places and to find new ways to enjoy them.
This park has its own project on iNaturalist, so check it out before heading out, and please add to our knowledge of this parks Biodiversity Mount Remarkable National Park, South Australia, and If you make it to the park during June please share some of your observations below.


Dwarf Greenhood Pterostylis nana from Narrow Gorge Trail #ownpic

Events that are on.

WEA Ramblers Bushwalking Club – Willowie Forest 7km Walk

Monday 14 June, 10:00am – 12:00pm
Willow Forest Trailhead, Mount Remarkable National Park
Cost: This event is FREE
Call Trevor Mead on 0413 433 725 to book

Ranger-guided sunset wildlife walk

5, 12, 13, 19 & 26 June, 4:30pm – 6:30pm
Mambray Creek Day Visitor Area, Mount Remarkable National Park
Cost: This event is FREE
View more information and book
@bigpete @corovilla @craig_williams @elfir @fossil1513 @ian_ke113 @larissabrazsousa @mandyshepherd @mary-a-crawf @moira_new38 @pam275 @plo_osborne @stekmer @verna29@wayneshore
@emmarooksby @fairypossum @jeannie_bartram @leonardocoelho @reef_scientist @tinaberghella

Ingresado el 29 de mayo de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

18 de mayo de 2021

Greg in Caloundra

I owe Stephen Fricker a post after all the work he does so here it is:
The adventure is had, the records have now been uploaded, but I want more!
I drove up from Caloundra on Saturday morning to find a busy hall full of people.
The plan was to join a botany field team. I am more familiar with flora than fauna mostly because plants are present and easy to photograph. I finally met my Facebook friend Gemma who got us into Marc Russell’s team, and we headed out to the open forest and beach ridges of Inskip point. There we met our team full of lovely people including Ann, Joolie, and more.
We hit the jackpot with Marc. He knew all but one or two species in this entire system and spent hours sharing knowledge on the local ecology.
We went through the flora and ticked a list Marc had created as well as build our survey through iNaturalist observations. We paid the most attention to plants but also took photos of anything else we saw.
After the excursion, we came back to HQ to upload our observations, but found the Wi-Fi was a little slow. I heard that Marc was taking a team to the rainforest at Poona Lake the next day and I become very jealous knowing that I had to go home that night. So I decided to upload later and just get out in the field.
The rainforest around Poona lake has a huge diversity diversity of flora. I spent a good 3 hours walking up and then down the road making observations of every different plant, fungus, and invertebrate I could find. The highlights here were the scorpion (Lychas species), the Skyblue pinkgill (Entoloma virescens complex), and the rare Archidendron lovelliae — Bacon Wood. Bacon wood is listed as Vulnerable and has a very restricted range north of Gympie and Fraser Island.

Skyblue Pinkgill Entoloma virescens Lychas spp. (right) © Greg Tasney (left),


Bacon Wood Archidendron lovelliae VN
Out of the rainforest I came at 7:30 with one last stop in mind – Camp Milo Road. Here I found a different habitat once again. On the side of the road was the most interesting and hard-to-find plant of all, a Genoplesium/Corunastylis psammophilum. A very uncommon Midge orchid. There are only 29 records on ALA and this species has restricted distribution from Moreton Island to Rainbow Beach.
I am already looking forward to next year where I will make sure that I stay for the whole weekend, get to more sites, talk to more people and improve my macro photography.
A big thank you to the organisers who hosted a wonderful event.

Post by @gregtasney

Ingresado el 18 de mayo de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

08 de mayo de 2021

April 2021 Challenge summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 5,821 (5430 in Australia)
Species 1,922
Identifiers 450
Observers 43 ( 17 with more than 50 observations)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @stephen169 @ludwig_muller @anthonypaul @hatwise @pam275 @timothyshields @mary-a-crawf @rwl @nyoni-pete @rich_fuller @donnamareetomkinson @luis615 @adel_plainsgirl @bigpete @leithallb

for more infromation check out the April Challenge-Updated Stats
This while only 42 observers contributed this month an increase on the previous month, together our observations accounted for around 7 % of all observations within Australia (76, 770) over the month of April (at time of writing). While the 36 observers constituted only <1% of all active observers iNaturalists within Australia.

For the latest results of the current Month check the
May Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to
April Challenge-Updated Stats
March Challenge-Updated Stats March summary
February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

Early in the month enthusiastic birder @sandy_horne made a trip to 'Gluepot' a famous birding spot in South Australia. While not a prolific uploader to iNaturalist Sandy is a diversity hound and the images are always of exceptional quality, I could learn a thing or three from her. Striped Honeyeater Plectorhyncha lanceolata (top left) and Grey Butcherbird Cracticus torquatus (top right) White-winged Chough Corcorax melanorhamphos (bottom left), Gluepot SA
bottom left to demonstrate she is not all about Birds (just mostly) a Genus Camponotus from Spring Gully SA ©SandyHorne.


iNaturalist is undergoing a giant leap forward?

You know Citizen Science and iNaturalist is undergoing a giant leap forward when you are recognized at night in the pouring rain by your iNaturalist profile picture.
The amazing Greg (AKA @gregtasney, and yes that Greg) ran into a lovely trio in the pouring rain at Boronia bushland reserve south of Brisbane on the weekend. Greg saw the flashlights and thought great a fellow spotlighter, so Greg said g'day. The spotlighter instantly asked if he was Greg Tasney from iNat. Then upon hearing the other person's name Zach, I instantly recognised them as Zach's observations (AKA @zachmalcomson ) were part of the reason Greg was at this location on that night. We stood talking in the pouring rain for two minutes before the weather became too much.

Northern Banjo Frog Limnodynastes terraereginae © Zach Malcomson, all rights reserved observed at Boronia Bushland Reserve, QLD.
After sitting in my car for 30 minutes to see out the rain the ever keen Greg had a good hour to check out this nice little parcel of bushland. Zach and Co.s torch beam may also have been seen again as Greg left.

The endangered Bristly Helmet Orchid Corybas hispidus observed by @gregtasney in Queensland

Want some more Moth Action? Have a look at these special guys!
The Orange-hooded Crest-moth (Fisera eribola), yeah ok, fits, but it's just not inspiring enough to do it justice.

@ellurasanctuary suggests Centurion-helmet Moth ... now that gives it a bit more of the pomp & ceremony it deserves 😉
This is a male, females have filiform antennae and are ~17mm long, with ~46mm wingspan.

Observer @sarinozi was fortunate to observe a group of 7 Hooded Plover's Thinornis cucullatus, including 2 juvenile and 1 tagged adult. This post for the tagged adult, below left, they kept being disturbed by passing dogs and left (this one missed when the rest took off, must've been watching the dog too closely. followed them, a minute later, after some stressed? upward, head bobbing). A reminder of the reason why dogs, although I love them should be kept ona leash around wildlife (or better not taken to such places)

Hooded Plover's Thinornis cucullatus ©sarinozi

I also note we have had some observations from South Africa by new member @ludwig_muller, a keen young iNaturalist, check out some of the amazing observations like these below Stapelia hirsuta (below left) and a Myrrhleaf Storksbill Pelargonium myrrhifolium (below right)

with the City Nature Challenge held over the first weekend of May this month it will be amazing to see what we find!

Thank you to all those that contributed this month, I hope you will continue to be involved.
@sarinozi @chrisseager @streglystendec @owen65 @aavankampen @melbo @dragonette @jeannie_bartram @carl_ramirez @nswanson @verna29 @ellurasanctuary @larissabrazsousa @sandy_horne @heathwallum @seamus-doherty @mickey63 @rubbery @natrydd @fairypossum
@gagars @bbrice @diondior @elfir @marionmackenzie @strawberry15

Ingresado el 08 de mayo de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 5 comentarios | Deja un comentario

02 de abril de 2021

March 2021 Challenge summary

Our Monthly Challenge continues with another splendid effort, in the last month we all contributed a massive effort. The numbers will only go up as people may upload observations in the next few weeks. As of writing, we have contributed
Observations 5370
Species 1,627
Identifiers 371
Observers 36 (14 with more than 50 observations)

@gregtasney @natashataylor @stephen169 @leithallb @fairypossum @anthonypaul @pam275 @donnamareetomkinson @rwl @luis615 @timothyshields @bigpete @chrisseager @adel_plainsgirl
for more infromation check out the March Challenge-Updated Stats

For the latest results of the current Month check the
April Challenge-Updated Stats

Check out how this compares to

February Challenge-Updated Stats February summary
January Challenge-Updated Stats January summary
December Challenge-Updated Stats December summary

With the City Nature Challenge (CNC) occurring at the end of the month let's make April a big month!
We also have two long weekends this month so a great time to get some practice in!

City Nature Challenge 2021, 30th April to 3rd May

This while only 36 observers contributed this month down two on the previous month, together our observations accounted for around 8 % of all observations within Australia (66, 803) over the month of March (at time of writing). While the 36 observers constituted only <1% of all active observers iNaturalists within Australia. Some significant finds mentioned by members include some fantastic wading birds observed by @sandy_horne including the threatened Red-necked Stint Calidris ruficollis (below left) and the Curlew Sandpiper Calidris ferruginea (below right) at Bald Hill Beach, South Australia. This stretch of coast hosts numerous resident shorebirds, several of which are listed as endangered including Curlew sandpiper, Ruddy turnstone, Red knot and Eastern Curlew in addition to migratory species.

Here is something I have learned recently thanks to @insiderelic and @ellurasanctuary, have you ever wondered what the fluffy bits on the tips of Short-leaf Bluebush Maireana brevifolia are? have a look at the individual below.

I encourage you to have a look at some of the magnificent observations like this Agile Tyrant Ant Iridomyrmex agilis (below right) and Tau Emerald Hemicordulia tau (below left) made by Brett AKA @ellurasanctuary ©ElluraSanctuary

Some significant or interesting observations over the month

A dead Port Jackson Shark Heterodontus portusjacksoni was observed by @adel_plainsgirl a great observation by someone that seldom visits the beach

Everyone loves Blue-bandeds bees (Genus Amegilla) and this is a spectacular shot of one in flight by @natashataylor

Another great observation by@Natasha of a White-banded House Jumping Spider Maratus scutulatus feeding on an Ant.

first observation of the introduced Cochlicella barbara, reported in Brisbane according to
@kevinbonham

Orchids Orchids Orchids

In Southern Australia, Midge Orchids are budding and flowering (see observations below by @rwl ). Indeed, some are producing capsules. we would like to encourage people to make observations and start photographing and recording these orchids on iNaturalist so that we get a record phenlology.

If you use Wild Orchid Watch, you can also include numerical and habitat data. If you enter from WOW, locations are automatically obscured, but not if you add to the project later; you need to do this manually.

There are plenty of orchid species around southern Australia, so you can all get involved! check out this Common Wasp Orchid Chiloglottis diphylla observed by @gregtasney and Identified by Lachlan Copeland.

Wild Orchid Watch AustraliaWILD ORCHID WATCH

There is amazing Biodiversity awaiting you, in the garden or in your nearby park so go for a walk this weekend and add to our knowledge of Adelaide's Biodiversity, and join for the CNC 2021 and the project!






Ingresado el 02 de abril de 2021 por stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario