Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 - Ironbark Gully Bendigo October 22-25th 2021

Contribute your nature observations while strolling through Bendigo and its surrounds on any or all of the four days in October.
Apologies for cross posts

Regards
Project administrator: aldopenbrook (Bendigo)

Great Southern Bioblitz
To find out more information about this event, check out Great Southern Bioblitz
To explore all the other amazing areas participating go to 'Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2021'
Follow on Twitter, Facebook (@GSBioblitz) and Instagram (gsbioblitz)

GSBioblitz - on Facebook
GSBioblitz - on Twitter
GSBioblitz - on Instagram
Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 Umbrella
Previous events:
Great Southern Bioblitz 2020 Umbrella
Check out this summary blog about the 2020 Great Southern Bioblitz 'Great Southern Bioblitz - Amazing First Year!' by Pete Crowcroft (AKA @possumpete )

@spacegecko
@jeff_melvaine
@melwood
@angem
@aldopenbrook
@geelong-nature-nerd
@grace_sibley
@michael1922
@crimsonwookiee
@garry34
@talus1972
@russellbest
@martinlagerwey
@abaddon
@jansutton
@russell115
@thunder-child
@reiner
@torhek
@wanderingandwilderness
@slsfirefight
@andill
@andrew_allen
@boykett
@edted
@sanguinedragonflye
@blaise_o
@ernewton
@kenharris
@nickstando
@kb_3550
@lachieforbes
@tayloab
@dangernoodlec137
@mickramsey
@kerriej
@melissa-morrison
@nicolekearney
@al1
@jasonmcc
@parksvictoria
@raggedeagle
@rbshe
@elusiveorchids
@jdagg
@lurlzz
@rogstanden
@chrisclarke25
@indrabone
@jarrad1
@jdcamilleri82
@jmpriest5
@joy20
@kg140
@lenkaschirmer
@marie_bonne
@noseymosey
@psycore
@stemstemmer
@andyfrank
@aspacelobster
@aussiecreature
@blaise_o_leary
@claedo
@isabella150
@johnlenagan
@nomesdoak
@ohlincha
@owenlishmund
@philippe314
@rebekaaah
@rubyredtuesday
@alanam
@blai
@carly1988
@dancg
@deluxe
@elainewilliams
@georectified
@homegrown3556
@jessicaloulawrence
@jessie208
@johnireland
@marsusram
@raimiller97
@saprosbro
@tleitch
@acwright
@adamaus
@amba
@andrewacton
@ashplantwitch
@aussiebleeder
@beau_meister
@benanna
@calamanthus
@carranya
@catloverdovey
@chrislindorff
@christophercaine
@cveld
@danielashdown
@duke_n
@eamw
@eileen64
@elisabethshapiro
@graemelunt
@johnboy
@jtee
@kathrynstan
@manderson80
@marika454
@mason87
@mattronsh
@nicole07070707
@regnans
@scootacamerons
@stanley8m
@warramaba
@abirm
@adindris
@alisonwatson
@ambikab
@andrew1434
@anita379
@annz_
@arthur296
@awiddis
@ayesha
@billelder
@bio327
@birdie-buddy
@brandle
@brendonwhitmore
@brigid13
@bunyip
@cap1
@cassie163
@cathal1
@chandes
@clarkey
@cmnoel
@craig66
@david-francis44
@dfraser85
@eliap
@emma1115
@ethan_lee
@fatdentist

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por aldopenbrook aldopenbrook | 1 comentario | Deja un comentario

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 - Ironbark Gully Bendigo October 22-25th 2021

Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 - Ironbark Gully Bendigo

October 22-25th 2021

Contribute your nature observations to the BioBlitz while strolling through Bendigo on any or all of the four days in October.
Apologies for any cross postings
Regards
Project administrator: @aldopenbrook (Bendigo)

Great Southern Bioblitz
To find out more information about this event, check out Great Southern Bioblitz
To explore all the other amazing areas participating go to 'Great Southern Bioblitz Umbrella- 2021'
Follow on Twitter, Facebook (@GSBioblitz) and Instagram (gsbioblitz)

GSBioblitz - on Facebook
GSBioblitz - on Twitter
GSBioblitz - on Instagram
Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 Umbrella
Previous events:
Great Southern Bioblitz 2020 Umbrella
Check out this summary blog about the 2020 Great Southern Bioblitz 'Great Southern Bioblitz - Amazing First Year!' by Pete Crowcroft (AKA @possumpete )

@spacegecko
@jeff_melvaine
@melwood
@angem
@aldopenbrook
@geelong-nature-nerd
@grace_sibley
@michael1922
@crimsonwookiee
@garry34
@talus1972
@russellbest
@martinlagerwey
@abaddon
@jansutton
@russell115
@thunder-child
@reiner
@torhek
@wanderingandwilderness
@slsfirefight
@andill
@andrew_allen
@boykett
@edted
@sanguinedragonflye
@blaise_o
@ernewton
@kenharris
@nickstando
@kb_3550
@ lachieforbes
@tayloab
@dangernoodlec137
@mickramsey
@kerriej
@melissa-morrison
@nicolekearney
@al1
@jasonmcc
@parksvictoria
@raggedeagle
@rbshe
@elusiveorchids
@jdagg
@lurlzz
@rogstanden
@chrisclarke25
@indrabone
@jarrad1
@jdcamilleri82
@jmpriest5
@joy20
@kg140
@lenkaschirmer
@marie_bonne
@noseymosey
@psycore
@stemstemmer
@andyfrank
@aspacelobster
@aussiecreature
@blaise_o_leary
@claedo
@isabella150
@johnlenagan
@nomesdoak
@ohlincha
@owenlishmund
@philippe314
@rebekaaah
@rubyredtuesday
@alanam
@blai
@carly1988
@dancg
@deluxe
@elainewilliams
@georectified
@homegrown3556
@jessicaloulawrence
@jessie208
@johnireland
@marsusram
@raimiller97
@saprosbro
@tleitch
@acwright
@adamaus
@amba
@andrewacton
@ashplantwitch
@aussiebleeder
@beau_meister
@benanna
@calamanthus
@carranya
@catloverdovey
@chrislindorff
@christophercaine
@cveld
@danielashdown
@duke_n
@eamw
@eileen64
@elisabethshapiro
@graemelunt
@johnboy
@jtee
@kathrynstan
@manderson80
@marika454
@mason87
@mattronsh
@nicole07070707
@regnans
@scootacamerons
@stanley8m
@warramaba
@abirm
@adindris
@alisonwatson
@ambikab
@andrew1434
@anita379
@annz_
@arthur296
@awiddis
@ayesha
@billelder
@bio327
@birdie-buddy
@brandle
@brendonwhitmore
@brigid13
@bunyip
@cap1
@cassie163
@cathal1
@chandes
@clarkey
@cmnoel
@craig66
@david-francis44
@dfraser85
@eliap
@emma1115
@ethan_lee
@fatdentist

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por aldopenbrook aldopenbrook | 1 comentario | Deja un comentario

hi

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por aldopenbrook aldopenbrook | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

金瑞治水園區110年小花蔓澤蘭移除工作假期

金瑞治水園區是一座利用天然地形築堤形成的「滯洪池」,因地理位置緊鄰周圍的山系及溪流,常年有源源不絕的活水注入,生態資源豐沛,尤以蜻蛉類種類眾多,幾已達全台灣紀錄種的1/3,是台北市第一座蜻蜓主題公園。

然而,生態環境良好的金瑞治水園區,近年來也難逃遭「綠癌-小花蔓澤蘭」入侵。生長快速、繁殖及擴散能力極強的小花蔓澤蘭僅以器械移除的效果並不好,根據林務局的資料,小花蔓澤蘭防治目前以人工拔除為主,每年自8月開始進行第一次拔蔓作業、10月間進行第二次,除可大量減少小花蔓澤蘭的生物量、預防開花結實外,也可清除殘根避免隔年再萌發,達到防治的效果。

邀請您捲起衣袖一起來移除小花蔓澤蘭,為動植物及我們自身美好的生存環境而揮灑汗水吧!

_________________________________________

💦主辦單位|
臺北市政府工務局水利工程處

👫協辦單位|
台北市內湖社區大學、台北市蝙蝠保育學會

👨‍🔧適合對象|
國中以上,對環境有熱忱有責任感者
(可申請國、高中服務時數、環教時數、志工服務時數)

💪 招募人數|
每梯次上限50人

📅 活動時間|
第一梯 110/9/25(六) 09:00-16:30
第二梯 110/9/26(日) 09:00-16:30

💰 課程費用|
活動完全免費
參加費用由水利處全額支付

報名網址:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeEzsMAQyUb-9z82J7SzXricok5744-GRWRV2MfXsIYUJlYwA/viewform

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por maiochiou maiochiou | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Nusa Penida Snorkeling September 11 2021

The mantas were amazing, and the corals were awesome.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por cheryl356 cheryl356 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

North side - 09/16/21

Thursday 9:20 -11:13 am: no newts.
Weather - cold, for a change. Air quality is also good.
Other roadkills: a small spider wasp.
I didn't hear or see any chipmunks this time. Maybe it was too cold. I spent some time looking for oak galls on scrub oaks, and found some interesting ones. Also, when I got back to the parking lot I heard two crows making a lot of noise. They were chasing a golden eagle, that then landed on a tall eucalyptus on the hill in front of me. A few minutes later it took off, and the crows followed.
Coverage: from the parking lot to the second stop sign.
Traffic: 7 trucks, 28 cars, 4 bikes, 17 pedestrians, and 19 cars parked by the road and in the parking lots (1 car at the far lot). It was very quiet again, a few trucks, cars, etc.
A link to all my observations of the day - https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?on=2021-09-16&place_id=any&user_id=merav&verifiable=any

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por merav merav | 1 comentario | Deja un comentario

The Maasai donkey as a domensal animal

(writing in progress)

What do you call animal species living mainly among humans but not kept captive?

Commensal, naturally.

What do you call species which have been selectively bred by humans? Domestic, of course.

What do you call populations of domestic species which live wild? Feral, surely.

But what do you call breeds within domestic species which look like wild animals, are no longer selectively bred, and serve humans part-time and voluntarily?

There has been no word for this, so how about 'domensal' (domestic/commensal)?

The Maasai 'breed' of the donkey (Equus asinus), which inhabits East African pastoral areas from Somalia across Kenya to Tanzania, conforms to this description; hence the appeal, to naturalists, of a quasi-wild animal. And, given that no wild ancestor survives (at least in pure form), the Maasai donkey is as close as we can get today to a lost member of the original fauna.

Pastoralists such as the Maasai have allowed the donkey to revert to a semi-feral state, while retaining intimate cohabitation. And the Maasai donkey returns to its anthropogenic burdens seasonally, with minimal coercion (see https://discover.hubpages.com/animals/The-Donkey-Meetings-of-Ole-Tepesi).

The Maasai donkey is not herded back to the corrals in the evenings, as are the domestic bost (Bos taurus/indicus), the domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and the domestic goat (Capra hircus) of the Maasai. Instead, it returns of its own accord, behaving in this sense like a commensal rather than a domestic animal.

Nor is the Maasai donkey exploited by the pastoralists for food (either flesh or milk). Its sole value is for transportation and then mainly on a seasonal basis, and it may or may not be individually 'owned' (branded) depending on which group of pastoralists is involved.

As far as I know, the pastoralists make little attempt to control the reproduction of the donkey; so there is negligible selective breeding despite considerable 'natural' selection.

Although it could be argued that the donkey remains permanently shaped by a previous history of selective breeding, what seems significant is that this population has remarkably consistent colouration, conforming to a wild pattern and lacking the irregular and asymmetrical features so obvious in the bost, sheep and goat kept by the same pastoralists. The Maasai donkey differs from its putative wild ancestors mainly in the reduced sizes of its body (adult average about 100 kg) and presumably brain. We do not know whether the wild-type colouration has been directly retained from the ancestral species, reverted to, or attained by recent hybridisation with the Somali wild ass (Equus africanus somaliensis).

https://www.pond5.com/stock-footage/item/83623359-two-donkeys-eating-red-sandy-soil-food-arid-african-desert

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-maasai-herdsman-herding-donkeys-equus-asinus-in-tanzania-east-africa-26343630.html

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-datoga-man-herding-donkeys-lake-eyasi-northern-tanzania-175256082.html

https://www.osiligilaimaasailodge.co.tz/activities/view/donkey-ride-with-the-maasai

https://i1.wp.com/borderjumpers.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/serengeti-11.jpg

https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/young-maasai-woman-with-donkeys-in-village-gm525772713-52928944

https://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photo-oldonyo-masai-village-donkeys-tanzania-image75190971

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jaygalvin/48878024206/in/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jaygalvin/48878218297/in/photostream/

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por milewski milewski | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Biodiversity Blitz Week 2 Update

We’re now past the half way mark of the September Biodiversity Blitz and the observation count is climbing. Our 170 ‘blitzers’ have logged 6,400+ observations and over 1,000 species. What an effort! With school holidays about to begin we hope to see more observers sign up to the blitz.

It has been a nail-biting week when it comes to the species count on the challenge leaderboard - https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/biodiversity-blitz-2021-melbourne - with Yarra Ranges and Mornington jostling for first position. Typically, less than 10 species separate us from Mornington.

When it comes to Yarra Ranges observations there has been a reordering of the flora in the top 10 compared to last week and some exciting newbies in our fauna list.

Top 10 flora:

  1. Love Creeper
  2. Prickly Moses
  3. Tough Rice Flower
  4. Australian Mountain Greenhood
  5. Wonga Vine
  6. Blackwood
  7. Pultenaea gunnii (golden bush-pea)
  8. Common Heath
  9. Three-corned Garlic
  10. Australian Clematis

Top 10 fauna

  1. Australian Painted Lady (butterfly)
  2. Crimson Rosella
  3. Laughing Kookaburra
  4. Magpie
  5. Grey Fantail
  6. Genus Chrysso (comb-footed spiders)
  7. Pied Currawong
  8. Western Honey Bee
  9. Australian Wood Duck
  10. Common Wombat

The Yarra Ranges Council Team

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por suz1966 suz1966 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

BIO111 LAB 2 -Joseph Jung

The Cabbage White Butterfly belongs to the rapae species, the pieris genus, and the Pieridae family.
Since it is a butterfly, it is classified in the Lepidoptera order, and the insecta class(all insects).
and all insects fall under the Arthropoda phylum and the Animalia kingdom.
the spices which include in the pieris genus, including the pieris rapae, generally have wing color close to white and very light green. This color can help in camouflaging with the color of flower while drinking nectar from the flower in order to avoid predation. Also, cabbage white butterfly larvae and caterpillar are green which is very useful to avoid predation from predators.
one adaptation that all of observations might have in common is probably their color, which helps them blend/camoflauge with their environment either to avoid predators or hide and wait for preys.
For example the Labyrinth Spider's body color is very similar to the color of rocks or dirt around its web.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por josephj josephj | 2 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Audrey Gilmour: Insects (Bioblitz lab 2- phylogeny and adaptations)

Phylogeny

Using the OneZoom phylogenetic tree, I located Helophilus fasciatus (Narrow-headed Marsh Fly) in relation to its sister species (Helophilus hybridus and Helophilus hochstetteri) and their common ancestor(s). They are all part of the Helophilus genus of the Ersitalini tribe, a subset of the Sirphidae family of the Diptera order which falls under the clade of winged insects (derived from Insects, a group of arthropods belonging to Protostomes and therefore animals) (Schoch CL, et al., 2020).

Common adaptation: tracheal breathing system

All the species we observed were insects and they share a common physiological adaptation. Insect respiration has adapted to best meet the oxygen demands associated with insects' high metabolic rates (Moerbitz & Hetz, 2010). Their respiratory system is composed of tubes (tracheae) that conduct air directly from the spiracles (external vents) to their tissues (Powell, 2003).

Bumblebee unique adaptation:

The bumblebees’ venomous sting serves as a pain-inflicting defense mechanism. The venom, delivered through a specialized stinging apparatus is produced in structures that evolved from female accessory reproductive glands. This physiological adaptation allows bees to defend their colonies from large predators and is therefore thought to have played a role in the evolution of their eusocial behavior (communal living) (Van Vaerenbergh, 2013).

Bibliography

Canadian Wildlife Federation. (2020). Why Join iNaturalist.ca? Retrieved September 16, 2021, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rFHM2HQwxo&t=129s.

Moerbitz, C., & Hetz, S. K. (2010). Tradeoffs between metabolic rate and spiracular conductance in discontinuous gas exchange of Samia Cynthia (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae). Journal of Insect Physiology, 56(5), 536–542. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2009.08.003

Powell, K. (2003). Bug breathing exposed. Nature. https://doi.org/10.1038/news030120-9

Schoch CL, et al. (2020). Taxonomy browser (helophilus). National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved September 17, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi?id=226173&lvl=0.

Team, O. Z. (n.d.). Onezoom Tree of life explorer, text page for Helophilus Altaicus. Retrieved September 17, 2021, from https://www.onezoom.org/life/@Helophilus_altaicus=4354527?img=best_any&anim=flight#x1006,y48,w1.4393.

Van Vaerenbergh, M. (2013). Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) and Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) Venom: Analysis and Immunological Importance of the Proteome. Ghent University. Retrieved September 16, 2021. https://biblio.ugent.be/publication/4194060/file/4336838

PhD thesis

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por audreygilmour audreygilmour | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Audrey Gilmour: Insects (Bioblitz lab 2- phylogeny and adaptations)

  1. Phylogeny

Using the OneZoom phylogenetic tree, I located Helophilus fasciatus (Narrow-headed Marsh Fly) in relation to its sister species (Helophilus hybridus and Helophilus hochstetteri) and their common ancestor(s). They are all part of the Helophilus genus of the Ersitalini tribe, a subset of the Sirphidae family of the Diptera order which falls under the clade of winged insects (derived from Insects, a group of arthropods belonging to Protostomes and therefore animals) (Schoch CL, et al., 2020).

  1. Common adaptation: tracheal breathing system

All the species we observed were insects and they share a common physiological adaptation. Insect respiration has adapted to best meet the oxygen demands associated with insects' high metabolic rates (Moerbitz & Hetz, 2010). Their respiratory system is composed of tubes (tracheae) that conduct air directly from the spiracles (external vents) to their tissues (Powell, 2003).

  1. Bumblebee unique adaptation: Venom

The bumblebees’ venomous sting serves as a pain-inflicting defense mechanism. The venom, delivered through a specialized stinging apparatus is produced in structures that evolved from female accessory reproductive glands. This physiological adaptation allows bees to defend their colonies from large predators and is therefore thought to have played a role in the evolution of their eusocial behavior (communal living) (Van Vaerenbergh, 2013).

Bibliography:
Canadian Wildlife Federation. (2020). Why Join iNaturalist.ca? Retrieved September 16, 2021, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rFHM2HQwxo&t=129s.

Moerbitz, C., & Hetz, S. K. (2010). Tradeoffs between metabolic rate and spiracular conductance in discontinuous gas exchange of Samia Cynthia (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae). Journal of Insect Physiology, 56(5), 536–542. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2009.08.003

Powell, K. (2003). Bug breathing exposed. Nature. https://doi.org/10.1038/news030120-9

Schoch CL, et al. (2020). Taxonomy browser (helophilus). National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved September 17, 2021, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Taxonomy/Browser/wwwtax.cgi?id=226173&lvl=0.

Team, O. Z. (n.d.). Onezoom Tree of life explorer, text page for Helophilus Altaicus. Retrieved September 17, 2021, from https://www.onezoom.org/life/@Helophilus_altaicus=4354527?img=best_any&anim=flight#x1006,y48,w1.4393.

Van Vaerenbergh, M. (2013). Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) and Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) Venom: Analysis and Immunological Importance of the Proteome. Ghent University. Retrieved September 16, 2021. https://biblio.ugent.be/publication/4194060/file/4336838

PhD thesis

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por audreygilmour audreygilmour | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Cindy Wang - Leaf - Rugosa Rose

The category of my observation for this experiment is leaves, and they are an essential component of all plants on earth. Leaves all have the same basic structure of midrib, an edge, veins, and a petiole, as well as the similar function of carrying out photosynthesis, which provides energy to plants converted from sunlight. The species that I find the most interesting out of all of my observations is the Rugosa Rose, and it is distinguished for its exceptionally large, bright red or orange-red fruits. Its leaves are dark green, wrinkly, and deeply veined leaflets that are toothed and oval-shaped. The phylogeny of this species can be traced back to the Genus Rosa branch of wild roses, which is widely distributed throughout temperate and sub-tropical habitats from the northern hemisphere to tropical Asia. Geographical analyses suggest that the mild weather and annual little fluctuation of temperature in Asia played a central role as a genetic reservoir in the evolution of the genus Rosa.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por cinderfantasy cinderfantasy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Peng Min--Observation of Spruce

One of the significant features of spruce is their needle leaves. This is an adaptation for them to have a better fitness in the northern temperate and boreal climate in order to survive. Evergreen needle reducing the surface area prevents them from further water-loss by transpiration. By genetic analysis, genus Picea originated from North America.
Trees I observed share in common that they all have well-developed root system. This also helps them to gain more water and nutrients.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por pengmin pengmin | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Species discovered in the United States of America

This is the number of species in each classification according to Inat's Stats for this project:

Insects - 31,708 species

Plants - 29,798 species

Fungi - 8,940 species

Other Animals - 4,817 species

Mollusks - 3,589 species

Arachnids - 2,326 species

Birds - 1,816 species

Reptiles - 914 species

Mammals - 842 species

Amphibians - 467 species

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por unkleloopy unkleloopy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lecture weekly assignment-03--observe and record

I found these insects and plants near a dirt road close to my home. They were kind of hard to see because they almost blended into their habitat but I thought they were interesting. I saw them on Tuesday, September 14th , 2021 on my way home from school. The habitat was dusty and there were lots of rocks and short stemmed plants, a perfect place for little insects and spiders to hide.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por mali6112 mali6112 | 4 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Lab 2 Journal Entry

I chose to look at the phylogeny for the Eastern Hemlock or Tsuga canadensis. It is a species of Hemlock, is part of the family Pinaceae, is an Acrogymnosperm, and more generally a vascular seed plant. One adaptation that the European Raspberry( Rubus Idaeus) has is thorns on its stems. This adaptation helps to prevent herbivores from eating the plant. If the plant is not eaten, the plant can produce berries with seeds and can reproduce/spread faster. Since all of my observed plants are vascular plants, an adaptation they have in common is xylem and phloem cells. These help conduct water and solutes through the plant.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por maiabergeron maiabergeron | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Updated Stats for Wyoming

Top 5 Categorial species for Wyoming

Plants make up 48.63%

Insects make up 32.73%

Fungi make up 6.77%

Birds make up 5.74%

Arachnids make up 1.96%

These 5 categories make up just under 96% of all observations for Wyoming

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por unkleloopy unkleloopy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Top 25 Individual Species as of September 2021

Top 25 Species for Wyoming are as follows:

  1. American Bison with 3,183 observations
  2. Wapiti with 2,148 observations
  3. Moose with 1,368 observations
  4. Pronghorn with 1,316 observations
  5. Mule Deer with 1,061 observations
  6. American Black Bear with 952 observations
  7. Brown Bear with 713 observations
  8. Sticky Geranium with 700 observations
  9. Coyote with 631 observations
  10. Fireweed with 631 observations
  11. Yellow-bellied Marmot
  12. Common Raven
  13. Silvery Lupine
  14. Common Yarrow
  15. Uinta Ground Squirrel
  16. Big Sagebrush
  17. Harebell
  18. Lodgepole Pine
  19. Arrowleaf Balsamroot
  20. Bighorn Sheep
  21. Mountain Bluebird
  22. Bald Eagle
  23. Monument Plant
  24. Creeping Mahonia
  25. Gray Wolf

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por unkleloopy unkleloopy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Updated Stats for Wisconsin

Top 5 Categorial Species for Wisconsin

Insects make up 38.02%

Plants make up 37.15%

Fungi make up 13.92%

Birds make up 3.96%

Arachnids make up 2.49%

These 5 categories make up just over 95% of all observations for Wisconsin

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por unkleloopy unkleloopy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Top 25 Individual Species as of September 2021

Top 25 Species for Wisconsin are as follows:

  1. Monarch with 2,518 observations
  2. Common Milkweed with 2,403 observations
  3. American Toad with 1,910 observations
  4. White-tailed Deer with 1,908 observations
  5. Jack-in-the-Pulpit with 1,759 observations
  6. Wild Geranium with 1,743 observations
  7. Wild Bergamot with 1,737 observations
  8. Mallard with 1,661 observations
  9. Bloodroot with 1,619 observations
  10. Common Buckthorn with 1,584 observations
  11. American Robin
  12. Eastern Gray Squirrel
  13. Garlic Mustard
  14. Canada Goose
  15. Sandhill Crane
  16. Common Eastern Bumble Bee
  17. Common Jewelweed
  18. Eastern White Pine
  19. Large White Trillium
  20. Red Columbine
  21. Mayapple
  22. Great Mullein
  23. Common Yarrow
  24. Dame's Rocket
  25. Wild Carrot

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por unkleloopy unkleloopy | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Honeysuckle (Lonicera)

Honeysuckle plants are located in the eukaryote part of the phylogeny. More specifically, located in the flowering plants categorized under Dipsacales. All of my observations have one main adaptation in common, which is adapting to the cold weather. Whether they hold on to dead leaves for insulation, stop growing in the cold, or simply regrow each year, these plants have adapted to the cold weather to be able to rebloom every season. Hemlocks have unique ways of adapting to their environment. They are shade tolerant, and their seeds can germinate in organic material.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por sarahmackie sarahmackie | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Journal Entry 1 - Annie

I believe I found Red Baneberries, which differ from all of my other observations because they are fruit, and my other observations are weed, leafy plants and flowers. In addition, these berries consist of fertilized seeds, plus the ovary wall, which my other observations do not have in common with the red baneberries.

The observations that I took are all plants that are low to the ground. These plants all take up essential nutrients from the soil through their roots and the air through their leaves. They also all share the same cell structures, such as the cell wall, chloroplast, and vacuoles.

I chose the flower chicory to observe on Onezoom and its phylogenic tree. The flower is part of the Cichorium Dubium species, part of Cichoriinae, a tribe in the plant family Asteraceae. This tribe falls under a larger group called, Cichorioideae, home to almost 40,000 species.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por annieehng annieehng | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Monsoon Beauty Awards and Recognition Update

Hello Friends

It has been nearly two weeks since the Monsoon Beauty event ended. You must be wondering what happened and why communications have been slow. Apologies for this delay.

The 53 days Journey (from 15th July 2021 to 5th September 2021) can only be described with one word Amazing.

The diversity of the 34000 odd observations is second only to the interest and participation of over a 1000 people (observers and identifiers combined). While it was an event located within the geographic boundaries of India we had friends joining in from all parts of the world. They added richness and expert education.

Some participants have communicated how much they have learned and how much more deeply engaged they have become with the natural world around them. Others have mentioned their positive interactions with other observers and with the so many great identifiers.

At the outset of the programme we had hoped for participation from 10 States or Territories (out of 36). However happily we received observations from 26 States or Union Territories. In some 10 regions we simply could not get people to join, this is a task for the next time.

We have had many new users join in and a significantly large proportion of women (26).

At the start of the event some people had questioned the “Gamefication” of the event through the incentive of awards. This was a risk, and truthfully we have had to deal with some concerns. A minority participated not to learn or contribute but to compete aggressively and their appreciation of nature and the community was secondary to self. They did not even attempt to engage with the community. Some users were indiscriminate and used bad processes in identification, while some observers got hyper competitive and may even have used unfair means to post many observations. In these cases we as event organizers have had to step in and attempt to address these concerns, sometimes we also got help from the iNaturalist Curator / Admin / Help group. For us as event organizers it is a learning we will take forward and incorporate in future events.

Over the next few days we will share some of the interesting outputs from the event, we will look into different taxonomic groups, special records. We will also try and profile some of the people. There have been quite a number of new records for either the country, or individual states, in some cases these observations are a 1st for the world as well. Rare organisms have been documented for the first time in the public domain or have been seen after intervals of over a 100 years.

Below is the list of awards. The awards are based not only on numbers but there has been an attempt to factor in some qualitative parameters as well. Below we have used the inaturalist user names for the participants.

We request all the 1st, 2nd and 3rd places in all of the categories to Direct Message their postal address to us or to send us an email on indiasnature01@gmail.com

We also request them to look at the Event page for the award guidelines and send in their selections as per the category

1 Category One - For Most Overall Observations

  1. First Place - @babloo_farswan with 4116 Observation (Using only a mobile smartphone)
  2. Second Place - @vivek_nature with 3131 Observations - (Using multiple DSLR cameras and smartphone)
  3. Third Place Joint - @navaneethsinigeorge with 1649 Observations (Using only a mobile smartphone)
  4. Third Place Joint - @hive with 1346 Observations (Using only a mobile smartphone)

@babloo_farswan is a very new user and worked very hard to not just document but also look at a diverse range of organisms some of which are first records for the State of Uttarakhand and a few of which are 1st records for India.

At the start of the programme @navaneethsinigeorge and @hive were very prolific and led the way for the rest of us. @hive, in particular, posted some fantastic and beautiful observations.

2 Category Two - Most Observations by a Rural Observer

  1. First Place - @rajkoranga with 2888 Observations - (Using only a mobile smartphone)
  2. Second Place - @kapil_chand with 789 Observations ((Using only a mobile smartphone)
  3. Third Place - @negi with 675 Observations (Bridge Camera and Mobile Phone)

@rajkoranga is also a fairly new user of iNaturalist. Using a mobile phone he too has documented an amazing array of high altitude flora and fauna. Some Butterfly observations posted by him are first records for the state since the British Collection Era, seen after an interval of over a 100 years.

3 Category Three -Most Observations in any one of the following states or Union Territories

(Lakshadweep, Dadra and Nagar Haveli and Daman and Diu, Tripura, Mizoram, Chandigarh, Nagaland, Manipur, Punjab)

The minimum Threshold was 150 observations. In only one of these States or Union Territories was there a maximum of only 7 observations posted. Hence this category of award is being scrapped and reallocated to Joint Awards in other Categories

4 Category Four - Most Observations by a New Observer

Most Observations by a new user who Joined after 1st July 2021 and / or has less than 200 observations at the start of the programme

  1. Joint First Place - @k_pawan with 1777 Observations - (Using only a mobile smartphone)
  2. Joint First Place - @ti_eramal with 639 Observations - (Using only a mobile smartphone)
  3. Second Place - @swapnendu_nayak with 789 Observations (Using only a mobile smartphone)
  4. Third Place - @nomadash with 476 Observations (Using only a mobile smartphone)

This is the most exciting category. New users who learned during the event and have been capturing and sharing an astounding diversity. @ti_eramal has shared vulnerable frogs and records of interesting plants and flowers.

5 Category Five - Most Identifications

Identifiers are the engine that run iNaturalist Events, without them we would neither be encouraged nor would be learn. During the course of the event 925 people have shared their valuable time and helped us identify many of our 34000 odd observations. We request every one to write to (Direct Message) identifiers and thank them specially for their hard work and effort.

  1. First Place - @muddytortoise with1269 observations.
  2. Second Place - @haneesh with 889 identifications.
  3. Third Place (Joint) - @borisb with 862 identifications.
  4. Third Place (Joint) - @anubhav-agarwal with 851 identifications.

6 Category Six - Jury’s Award - New Women Observers

This award is being presented to new women users. One of the focus areas of this event was to encourage women observers and hopefully we are at the start of a longer and more supportive series of events and processes.

  1. First Place - @varsh1 with 572 observations
  2. Second Place - @saumya_singh with 337 observations.
  3. Third Place - @surabhi_srivastava_gaur with 309 observations.

We are happy to report that there are a fair number of new users. Also at last count there are atleast 26 women participants which is almost 3 times the iNaturalist India average.

7 Special Mention

Some participants were kind enough to share their observations for posting on Social Media. These are their observations

Hispa Beetle - Chosen as the iNaturalist Observsation of the day. Observer @saumya_singh
Green Fruit-piercing Moth - observer @ti_eramal
Common Birdwing Butterfly - observer @rajabandi
Pepper Plant - observer @rajabandi
Volucella Drone Flies & Kin - observer @babloo_farswan
Grasshopper - observer @babloo_farswan
Gaudy Grasshopper - Poekilocerus pictus - observer @jungli92
Typical Orbweaver Spider - observer @kapil_chand
Common Swallowtail Caterpillar - observer @kashif_ali
Common Redeye Butterfly - observer @navaneethsinigeorge
Giant Firefly - observer @krishna31
Thyas juno Moth - observer @aibor
The Vulnerable Indian Star Tortoise - observer @paulmathi
An endangered Tiger seen on or around International Tiger Day - observer @mirza8

8 Tables

8.1 Table 1 - Observers

A total of 103 people poster observations during the course of the project.
This table provides information about the observer, when they joined iNaturalist, and how many observations they had at the start of the programme.
Of the 103 participants 42 qualify (with 150 or more observations) for a Certificate of Participation. This would be sent to them soon.

This data is as on 5th September 2021 at 11:59 PM (23:59) IST

Rank User Observations Category 1 Overall Category 2 Rural Category 4 New User Category 6 Jury’s Award (New Women) Date of Joining Inat Observations before 15th July 2021
1 @babloo_farswan 4116 1st 28/Apr/21 182
2 @vivek_nature 3131 2nd 15/Sep/20 832
3 @rajkoranga 2888 1st 24/Dec/20 40
4 @k_pawan 1777 1st Jt 28/Feb/21 111
5 @navaneethsinigeorge 1649 3rd jt 25/Jul/20 4238
6 @hive 1321 3rd jt 18/Jul/19 2141
7 @rajabandi 1257 29/Oct/19 2512
8 @subbu107 1209 13/Jun/16 5373
9 @elavarasan_mm 1177 26/Apr/20 5266
10 @ram_k 1025 06/Jun/20 1844
11 @naeempamparambil 891 07/Sep/20 1142
12 @kapil_chand 789 2nd 11/Mar/21 1311
13 @negi 675 3rd 09/Jun/20 2920
14 @odonut 675 24/May/20 1092
15 @ti_eramal 639 1st Jt 18/Jul/21 1
16 @varsh1 572 1st 12/Jul/21 30
17 @vivekbgirija 541 10/Aug/20 1630
18 @swapnendu_nayak 531 2nd 26/Jul/21 0
19 @unnikrishnan_mp 514 09/Feb/19 856
20 @paulmathi 490 03/Apr/20 1946
21 @nomadash 476 3rd 05/Jun/20 51
22 @naturalist_aditya 386 04/Aug/20 1722
23 @jaya_rakesh 369 11/Dec/16 876
24 @balakrishnan07 343 12/Jan/20 762
25 @vijay_dixit 337 07/Jun/20 4277
26 @saumya_singh 337 2nd 16/Feb/21 28
27 @surabhi_srivastava_gaur 309 3rd 04/Oct/19 93
28 @aadyathammaiah 282 19/Jan/21 13
29 @nageshwaran_nageshwaran 270 03/Jul/21 29
30 @anubhav-agarwal 270 20/Sep/19 6348
31 @csbandi 257 01/Dec/19 1609
32 @subhalaxmi_muduli 246 05/Apr/21 42
33 @aibor 237 15/May/21 257
34 @swatiudayraj 208 25/Sep/19 1131
35 @azhagu 193 30/Sep/19 271
36 @hrishialpha 191 28/Apr/21 146
37 @swanand 186 23/Oct/17 3802
38 @kartiksundar 183 04/Mar/18 509
39 @ygurjar 180 22/Feb/15 17540
40 @virenvaz 174 02/Jul/21 11
41 @swati_sagarika_dakua 156 31/Jul/21 0
42 @kamleshatwal 156 10/Sep/20 1981
43 @ramanarayanan 141 04/Feb/20 613
44 @arvintrix 132 13/Jul/21 1
45 @krishna31 122 31/Aug/20 299
46 @r_priya 103 24/Aug/21 0
47 @himanshupandav 99 06/Dec/18 509
48 @chayantgonsalves 84 18/Jul/20 1079
49 @firos_ak 77 01/Oct/16 4319
50 @sagarika_chen 76 17/Apr/19 874
51 @prabhas 69 19/Jun/21 2
52 @paran_amitava 61 14/Apr/21 2
53 @jungli92 55 22/Jan/21 1
54 @mann97 55 04/Sep/20 66
55 @sangavi 55 17/Jun/20 465
56 @teratornis 52 31/Oct/19 616
57 @prakash_chand 52 29/Apr/21 490
58 @hari_mt 51 01/Jul/21 34
59 @svabhukohli 46 13/Mar/20 28
60 @umesh_rana 45 12/Jul/21 0
61 @shyamphartyal 43 27/Dec/17 369
62 @kashif_ali 43 11/May/21 92
63 @ashitha 43 08/Sep/20 407
64 @punurip 42 19/Jul/21 12
65 @bhupinder_singh_nagi 42 01/Jul/21 2
66 @kamal_bisht 42 09/Jun/20 665
67 @sarita_nayak 41 26/Jul/21 4
68 @mrigank_shekhar 40 16/Jun/21 34
69 @harish9 40 11/Jun/20 346
70 @reetu_farswan 37 16/Jul/21 1
71 @sanjaybisht 34 12/Jun/20 626
72 @sakshis 30 18/Jul/20 194
73 @madhukar_adepu 30 14/Jul/21 0
74 @puneet4 29 23/Mar/20 168
75 @nishie 28 12/Jul/21 0
76 @tarun_titgaien 28 26/Sep/20 722
77 @tanuja5 24 12/Jul/21 1
78 @triloksinghrana 22 29/Jun/20 40
79 @devika_mb 21 27/Jul/20 329
80 @megha_lifeofferings 19 10/Jul/21 2
81 @chithams1 19 06/Mar/21 39
82 @monicapillai 16 27/Jul/21 0
83 @lovejeet01 16 01/Apr/21 403
84 @savitri_joshi 16 07/Mar/21 387
85 @hopeland 16 09/Jul/16 4957
86 @rashubh 13 18/Jul/21 11
87 @garima11 8 05/Sep/21 0
88 @muddytortoise 8 29/Jul/19 235
89 @animal_hobby 7 27/Mar/19 214
90 @finding_nimo_ 6 21/Aug/21 14
91 @scientific_alan 6 26/Nov/20 74
92 @bacchidangwal 6 10/Jun/20 286
93 @pratheek 6 12/May/18 37
94 @ryan_satish 5 07/May/21 12
95 @rohit_nandakumar 4 26/Jan/21 49
96 @mirza8 4 12/Jul/21 0
97 @aastha1 3 13/Jul/21 0
98 @deepak_aggarwal 3 31/May/21 5
99 @vishalkumarprasad 3 10/Sep/20 1
100 @parveez 2 02/Aug/21 7
101 @kelly_india 2 15/Jul/21 0
102 @emforests 2 26/Jan/21 5
103 @mountainjen 1 08/Jun/20 0

8.2 Table 2- Top 20 Identifiers

Twenty people who identified 300 or more observations are being awarded a Certificate of Appreciation for their efforts in helping the observers with species / genus or family identifications. Only our limited resources prevent us from honouring the identifiers in greater depth.

Rank Identifiers Name Identifications Rank
1 @muddytortoise 1269 1st
2 @ram_k 975 **
3 @haneesh 889 2nd
4 @borisb 862 3rd Jt
5 @anubhav-agarwal 851 3rd Jt
6 @amila_sumanapala 778
7 @odonut 755
8 @hrishialpha 703
9 @subirshakya 665
10 @zebs 639
11 @elavarasan_mm 619
12 @azhagu 616
13 @pierotoni10 594
14 @abhijatshakya 544
15 @firos_ak 493
16 @unnikrishnan_mp 482
17 @pihlaviita 452
18 @naturalist_aditya 340
19 @nagabhushanjyothi 329

ram_K as an organizer of the event is not eligible for any award

8.3 Table 3 - Observations & Observers by States or Union Territory

Rank State or Union Territory Observations in the Event Observers Observations as on 1st June 2021
1 Uttarakhand 12722 34 41975
2 Kerala 4475 9 86583
3 Tamil Nadu 3294 14 50332
4 Chhattisgarh 3131 1 25793
5 Karnataka 2270 14 79151
6 Odisha 1821 8 7842
7 Maharashtra 1381 11 106099
8 Andhra Pradesh 1190 2 16930
9 Telangana 1127 5 7337
10 Meghalaya 892 2 6787
11 Himachal Pradesh 830 2 7818
12 Madhya Pradesh 377 2 9997
13 Uttar Pradesh 308 4 6548
14 Jharkhand 214 1 2600
15 Bihar 210 2 1753
16 Goa 113 4 9763
17 Gujarat 57 2 21842
18 Assam 56 2 52684
19 Sikkim 44 1 3109
20 West Bengal 14 2 37362
21 Manipur 7 1 1242
22 Haryana 4 1 4264
23 Punjab 2 1 1322
24 Chandigarh 2 1 445
25 Rajasthan 1 1 13737
26 Delhi 1 1 4920
27 Arunachal Pradesh 0 0 10441
28 Jammu and Kashmir 0 0 3920
29 Andaman and Nicobar Islands 0 0 2659
30 Puducherry 0 0 2255
31 Ladakh 0 0 1992
32 Nagaland 0 0 908
33 Mizoram 0 0 444
34 Tripura 0 0 442
35 Dadra and Nagar Haveli and Daman and Diu 0 0 356
36 Lakshadweep 0 0 260
26


Do send in your comments, and queries either via direct message to @ram_k or post it in the comments below.

Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por ram_k ram_k | 7 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Spring BioBlitz Results (Week 2)


Results for the second week of the Spring BioBlitz Series below. Each series continues this Friday, Saturday and Sunday with the following events:


After School BioBlitz Series - 21AS3 Event - Friday 17th September, 3pm - 11pm. What can you discover on a Friday afternoon and evening.
Micro BioBlitz Series - 21M3 Event - Saturday 18th Sept, 11am - 12pm. Again, you've got 60min to discover as much as you can.
Fathom BioBlitz Series - Tosia Event - Sunday 19th Sept. The first of the Fathom Series. Head to the beach to record as many marine species as you can.


First in the Soaring BioBlitz Series this Spring, the Rhipidura Event brought in 12 observations covering 11 species from 5 observers. The weather put quite a damper on the day. Top 10 observed species below.


Second in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M2 Event (10am - 11am) Event brought in a total 107 observations covering 75 species from 15 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.


Second in the After School Series this Spring, the 21AS2 Event brought in a total 98 observations covering 82 species from 26 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 17 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21AS2 Event Results


Second in the After School Series this Spring, the 21AS1 Event brought in a total 98 observations covering 82 species from 26 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 16 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21AS2 Event Results


Second in the After School Series this Spring, the 21AS2 Event brought in a total 98 observations covering 82 species from 26 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 16 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21M2 Event (10am - 11am) Event Results


Second in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M2 Event (10am - 11am) Event brought in a total 107 observations covering 75 species from 15 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 16 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21M2 Event (10am - 11am) Event Results


Second in this Micro Bioblitz Series this Spring, the 21M2 Event (10am - 11am) Event brought in a total 107 observations covering 75 species from 15 observers. The top 10 observed species are shown below.



Ingresado el 16 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Rhipidura Event Results


First in the Soaring BioBlitz Series this Spring, the Rhipidura Event brought in 12 observations covering 11 species from 5 observers. The weather put quite a damper on the day. Top 10 observed species below.



Ingresado el 16 de septiembre de 2021 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Más